Finding Faith in Secular Grace

Tris Mamone
3 min readJul 2, 2021

Originally published at https://www.splicetoday.com.

I still love Rich Mullins. The late Christian singer/songwriter may be best known for the dreadful “Awesome God” (which even Mullins admitted wasn’t one of his best songs), but the rest of his catalogue is much better. His music mixed elements of classical (“Sing Your Praise to Lord”), Celtic (“The Color Green”), and African music (“How Can I Keep Myself from Singing?”), which made him stand out from most garbage Christian music. He was also brutally honest; at concerts, he stood onstage barefoot and unshaven, shared his thoughts between songs about how the Church had strayed far from Christ’s message of grace, and openly talked about his own flaws.

Brennan Manning’s book The Ragamuffin Gospel was a huge influence on Mullins. Manning was an ex-Franciscan priest whose lifelong struggles with alcoholism led him to a deeper appreciation of God’s grace. “To live by grace means to acknowledge my whole life story, the light side and the dark,” he wrote. “In admitting my shadow side, I learn who I am and what God’s grace means… My deepest awareness of myself is that I am deeply loved by Jesus Christ, and I have done nothing to earn it or deserve it.” It’s this message of radical grace that I miss the most about Christianity.

Everything else about Christianity I could’ve done without: trying to make ancient texts relevant for modern times, hearing nothing but silence after begging God for guidance, feeling ashamed for not wanting to wait until marriage, etc. Even the positive aspects of the faith-community, music, and wonderment-can be found outside the Church. The only thing missing is a secular version of the idea that God is picking up the broken pieces of my life and creating something beautiful from the mess. What does it mean to live by grace as an atheist, or is it even an option?

David Ames blogs at Graceful Atheist and hosts the podcast of the same name, both of which center around a concept he calls “secular grace:” loving people the way they are, without being commanded to do so by a god. “When I was a Christian, I was a grace junkie,” Ames writes, “and I stayed a Christian much longer than I would have without my understanding of grace. I understood on a deep level my need for acceptance.”

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Tris Mamone

LGBTQ News Columnist and Journalist. They/them. Bylines: Splice Today, Rewire, Swell, HuffPost, INTO, etc. trismamone@gmail.com